Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market
Taste Test

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

May 7, 2016

Canned cold-cuts might not exactly be a gift from the culinary gods, but it has long been a necessity in home cooks’ kitchens. Luncheon meat especially, has become the essential household grocery item, universally loved and stored in kitchen cupboards almost everywhere. It’s a quick fix for meaty cravings—and a simple solution for people who are helpless when it comes to wielding a spatula. They’re easy enough to spot in supermarket aisles, and are offered in a number of different brands. But with the many choices available, which can do you put in the cart?

The Rules:

  • The luncheon meat must be bought from a local grocery store/ supermarket.
  • Luncheon meat must be tasted as it is, coming straight from the can.
  • Luncheon meat must not be “flavored” (e.g. Barbecue luncheon meat, Longganisa luncheon meat, spicy, jalapeño, etc.)
Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

Valley Farm Chunky Pork Luncheon Meat

This luncheon meat deserves recognition for its use of real shredded pork, although sparingly. This added not only to the overall meatiness, but also to its texture.
Flavor: 3/5
Texture: 4/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

Purefoods Luncheon Meat

Purefoods was a little more mushy instead of meaty. Some people might prefer this quality in luncheon meat, but not everyone is a fan. The texture and the flavor seemed to give away the food product’s artificiality even more.
Flavor: 2/5
Texture: 1/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

Deli Mondo Luncheon Meat

Priding themselves on being Filipino and farm-fresh, Deli Mondo did not disappoint. The meat they use tasted organic and authentic, and seemingly well-seasoned for something coming from a tin can. But of course, something like this is a little pricker than the rest of the options on offer.
Flavor: 5/5
Texture: 4/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

Ma Ling

Ma Ling is a known classic in the Philippines, and is a trademark canned brand. It proves to live up to its reputation with its homey taste, that will remind you of childhood breakfasts.
Flavor: 5/5
Texture: 4/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

Farm Town Pork Luncheon Meat

Farm Town’s Pork luncheon meat is not memorable in its taste. Its main asset is in the fullness of its meat.

Flavor: 3/5
Texture: 2/5

 

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

La Filipina Luncheon Meat

La Filipina easily falls under one of the best in this list. The texture of the meat is interestingly somewhat creamy, and its flavor whole. The meat also tastes closer to real cold-cuts than most of the items on this list.
Flavor: 5/5
Texture: 3/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

CDO Chinese Style Luncheon Meat

CDO’s Chinese Style luncheon meat is, at best, average when it comes to the three criteria. It doesn’t really impress, nor does it really disappoint.
Flavor: 3/5
Texture: 2/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

Prime Pork Luncheon Meat

This luncheon meat gives justice to its name, as it comes close to the feel and taste of pork.
Flavor: 4/5
Texture: 4/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

SPAM Luncheon Meat

This all-time favorite never fails to hit the spot. It is the luncheon meat of all luncheon meats, and rightfully so. There’s still no denying the fact that what it lacks in its authentic meatiness, it makes up for in flavor. The texture of SPAM fresh out of the can is also not as good as when fried. But one thing’s for sure: at this point, there’s really no getting rid of SPAM.
Flavor: 5/5
Texture: 4/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

Tulip Pork Luncheon Meat

Tulip puts import-quality meat in a can. The authentic and rich taste of pork is there, but is downplayed in this particular luncheon meat’s texture.
Flavor: 4/5
Texture: 2/5

Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market

Philips Gold Pork Luncheon Meat

Philips Gold’s luncheon meat is firm, yet quite soft in texture. And despite its being one of the more expensive of the lot, it is surprisingly not as meaty as compared to some. But what redeems this canned cold-cut is its flavor.
Flavor: 4/5
Texture: 2/5

9 comments in this post SHOW

9 responses to “Taste Test: A Guide to the Best Luncheon Meat on the Market”

  1. A says:

    What does “tasted organic” taste like? Paki explain please.

    • Heiko Schmidt says:

      I was wondering the same thing. How can one say that something tastes organic? It would be nice if an explanation is given. I’ve had organic food and somehow I really cannot tell them apart from the non-organic ones.

    • Deus Manila says:

      Baka lasang damo.

  2. KSG says:

    Such a bad article. I like the idea but the criteria? The commentary? What, is Maling rated so high just because it reminds you of your childhood? Honestly the least you can do is include the price. You can do better than this, Pepper.

  3. DEEZQUS says:

    Do I see a piece of hair (or somethin like it) on that Valley farm luncheon meat? I had to scratch my screen to make sure that aint from my PC. And zoom in, really looks like hair tho.

  4. MontyWest says:

    Do people really eat luncheon meat straight out of the can? Should have done the test after it’s been cooked.

  5. Simoun the Jeweller says:

    Eat a real meatloaf or embotido or a galatina if you want real meaty taste, as all of these things WILL taste synthetic.

    Don’t get me started with La Filipina and Valley Farm. Served them to meat-loving, non-picky eaters, and I’ll tell you that they’d prefer Purefoods and Spam anytime.

    What got me aghast is when I see Ma Ling was rated high due to fond childhood memories.
    After a past product recall due to safety, I began eating it sparingly, much to my nostalgia’s dismay. Taste-wise, reminds me of provincial poverty. Seriously, it doesn’t really taste much differently from CDO or even the first two mentioned here.

    Side note: I have tried all these luncheon meats, except one. Got me curious about Delimondo, though.

  6. red snapper1 says:

    Anybody who hawks Ma Ling is probably not being sincere. And I can’t trust anybody who can’t tell that Purefoods Luncheon Meat is identical to SPAM in taste and texture. Perhaps this person did not notice the Hormel Logo on the Purefoods Luncheon Meat label! Hormel, incidentally is the manufacturer of SPAM.

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