Reviews

Kimukatsu Review: Mille-Feuille Katsu

June 16, 2019

I have a brother-in-law who is absolutely, unequivocally obsessed with tonkatsu. He has dragged me along to countless lunches and dinners, to try almost every katsu place in the region. All these trips have made me very opinionated about what I look for in my katsu. I go all out, always ordering the rosu—usually the fattiest cut—because really, lets admit it—it gives the best bite. Having more soft, unctuous, semi-melting layers of fat always tenderizes pork, and encasing all that in a crisp layer of panko bread crumbs only increases your gustatory experience.

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The thought of eating in Kimukatsu terrified me—I am the type of person who commits to their favorite meals, and was unhappy that I was being dragged to a katsu place that didn’t specialize in my favorite rosu cut. “What is this damn 25 layer business?”, I thought. Why do these people have to try and recreate the moistness that fat achieves, in a different way? Why can’t they let me cheat on my diet properly?

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The answer is because Kimukatsu believes they have achieved taste and texture superior to other cutlets, with their 25-layer, mille-feuille style katsu. By cutting their pork paper-thin and layering it, the natural juices are meant to stay within each piece. Kimukatsu also cooks their pork at a lower temperature for 8 minutes, then sets it aside. This is meant to let it heat inside evenly, and make the cutlet less greasy.

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4 Flavor Kimukatsu set (PHP 1,500)

When the katsu is in front of you, I have to say, picking up a piece is visually impressive, as all layers are evident at first sight.

Here, sets are served with unlimited rice, miso soup, shredded cabbage and pickles, which have become the norm for tonkatsu joints around the city. It is a feast, and everything is cooked well, even though the flavors at Kimukatsu are the same as they are everywhere else. The signature katsu comes in 7 varieties—Plain, Garlic, Black Pepper, Cheese, Negi Shio (spring onion), Yuzu Kosho (yuzu and chilli pepper), and Ume Shiso (sour plum and shiso leaf). When the katsu is in front of you, I have to say, picking up a piece is visually impressive, as all layers are evident at first sight. The yuzu pepper, with layers of yuzu paste tucked in between each thin slice, looks even more appetizing.

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Plain is definitely for purists, but when compared to rosu cutlets, it isn’t all that impressive. If you come to Kimukatsu, order the flavored katsu instead.

Plain is definitely for purists, but when compared to rosu cutlets, it isn’t all that impressive. The difference in moistness and texture isn’t extremely noticeable, and the porky flavor, while present, is not so intense. If you come to Kimukatsu, order the flavored katsu instead, since this stuff will really be what sets them apart from the rest. Garlic had a strong, pungent aroma, and the bite to  match it. Yuzu Pepper was also successful, with an acidic kick, followed by a subtly punchy heat. I tend to eat my tonkatsu the way I was taught by a Japanese chef—dipped in flaked salt that has been ground together with sesame seed, then finished with lemon—and this method suited both those flavors. Ume Shiso was a little less successful, without either the tartness of the plum or the taste of shiso leaf shining through. The seafood set was also serviceable, with a plump oyster making the grade.

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Assorted seafood set (PHP 480)

If you are into pork for its precious, precious lard, then I suggest sticking to your favorite tonkatsu joint.

The service was friendly and efficient, and the place, decked in black, was a lot sleeker, and more refined than other restaurants that serve up similar fare. However, in spite of how much it tried, Kimukatsu couldn’t convert me from my Kurobuta rosu-loving ways. The food is definitely good, including other menu items such as Agedashi Tofu, and worth a visit, but if you are into pork for its precious, precious lard, then I suggest sticking to your favorite tonkatsu joint.

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Rating: 6.5/10

Kimukatsu
5F East Wing, Shangri-La Plaza
Shaw Boulevard, cor Edsa
(02) 7270333

Pamela Cortez Pamela Cortez

Pamela Cortez writes about food full-time, and has honed her craft while writing for publications such as Rogue, Town and Country, and The Philippine Star. She once rode on a mule for a mile just to eat mint tea and lamb in Morocco, and has eaten a block of Quickmelt in one sitting. Her attempt at food photography can be viewed online @meyarrr.

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2 responses to “Kimukatsu Review: Mille-Feuille Katsu”

  1. L says:

    I was fortunate enough to be able to try the newly opened Kimuskatsu branch here in the Philippines, as well as the original Kimukatsu in Tokyo. I thought that the katsu in Tokyo branch had an unexpected yet welcome texture, but didn’t impress in terms of taste. The local branch on the other hand didn’t bring anything new in terms of texture and taste. I was quite disappointed. I wanted to like Kimukatsu’s katsu but right now, I think I prefer the normal pork cutlets.

  2. DB says:

    Tried it a few weeks ago. Meat was really dry.

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