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Ghetto Grub: Kalabaw Bulalo

June 13, 2019

Xavierville Avenue may not be the first area that comes in to mind as far as Ghetto Grub is concerned, but as Pepper.ph has shown in the past, this street does have its gems.

Kalabaw bulalo1

Xavierville Avenue may not be the first area that comes in to mind as far as Ghetto Grub is concerned, but as Pepper.ph has shown in the past, this street does have its gems.

Adding to this line-up is an unnamed makeshift eatery that serves karinderya fare. (Technically, it’s already on Chico Street, but it’s close enough to Xavierville so I just let the actual location slide.) While most meals aren’t out of the ordinary, it was the huge sign that exclaimed their specialty of “Kalabaw (Water Buffalo) Bulalo” that caught my eye.

I’m a big bulalo fan, or more specifically, a fan of all the tendons, gristle, and marrow that come with the bone. I like the meat, of course, but give me all that connective tissue, some toyomansi and chili, and a steaming bowl of white rice and I’m a happy guy.

Kalabaw bulalo3

While I do enjoy gristle, I was a little disappointed that my order came with almost all tendons and gristle. I had tried tapang kalabaw before, and I remembered enjoying its rich flavor, so I was hoping I would sample the same meat here. I guess they used the cheaper cut below the leg, which didn’t have as much meat.

Lack of meat notwithstanding, the bowl of bulalo still hit the spot.

The tendons and tissue just had a subtle beef taste, but was very tender and gelatinous. Slurping the soup yielded most of the flavor that came from the (miniscule amount of) meat, as well as the bones of the kalabaw. Cooking this dish is a labor of love, as it must take hours to get the kalabaw that tender.

I took a peek at the pot where all the bulalo was cooked, and I suspect you may be able to get to take your pick of a relatively meatier portion, though I guess it may cost you more. My order of a bowl of bulalo, a half order of stir fried veggies, and a cup of rice set me back around PHP 80 pesos.

Kalabaw bulalo2

It’s not an everyday dish to enjoy. But when you’re craving for a hot bowl to slurp on, this will surely serve you well.

The Verdict: 6/10

Good place to try cheap kalabaw. I hope they get cuts with more meat, though.

Pros:

  • Cheap
  • Serves dishes you won’t find everyday
  • The bulalo is always hot

Cons:

  • Actual meat for the bulalo is almost non-existent
  • You’re eating on the sidewalk. Beware of smoke belching vehicles

Kalabaw Bulalo
Chico cor. Langka Street, Quezon City

Nico Goco Nico Goco

Nico is an engineer with a fondness for food, drink, and cooking. This is in serious conflict with his desire to lose weight. Writing is his outlet to make sure the right side of his brain still works. When free, he likes to read, travel, and nurture a dozen different hobbies. He also believes that the perfect fried chicken is the cure to anything.

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3 comments in this post SHOW

3 responses to “Ghetto Grub: Kalabaw Bulalo”

  1. Volts Sanchez says:

    Doesn’t look bad, but no meat = no deal.

  2. Aimee Buzeta says:

    looks good. 🙂

  3. Roman Candelabra says:

    80 bucks for all of this? not really that cheap.

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