Recipes

Dirty Ice Cream Candy: How to Combine Your Two Childhood Treats

March 14, 2016

A welcome respite from the summer heat, one that undoubtedly transcends all generations, is ice cream. Sure, they come in pints, and bars, and tubs so deep you can save them to store next week’s adobo, but the cheapest, and arguably tastiest, is out on the streets.

First, there’s dirty ice cream. Even the name is alluring. . . dirty. Regardless, everyone willingly devours scoops of them. Tucked away in those colorful carts and heralded by the sound of a bell, their flavors shift each time, oftentimes ube, chocolate, or cheese, then sometimes you hit gold with mango or avocado. Second to bat is ice candy. Whether store-bought or homemade, these babies are one of the life’s lessons on opening things with your teeth. Melon and coconut are usual flavors at home, while sari-sari stores will pass out frozen juice as their renditions.

With Manila heating up, it’s only natural that we make our own version, an offspring summer’s two cheap children, worth waiting for by the freezer to come out and play.

IC

Dirty Ice Cream Candy

Total Time: 3 – 6 hours (15 mins prep, freeze overnight)
Yield: 12 pieces, estimated

Ingredients: Ice Cream Base

  • 2 cups whipping cream
  • 1 395ml can condensed milk

Flavor Variation: Ube

  • 1/2 cup ube jam, halaya
  • 1 tsp ube extract

Flavor Variation: Chocolate

  • 2 Tbsp cocoa powder, unsweetened

Flavor Variation: Cheese

  • 1/3 cup processed cheese, cut into small cubes
  • 6–8 drops yellow food coloring, optional

Procedure

  1. Whip the cream until soft peaks form. Store in the refrigerator.
  2. Mix the condensed milk with the flavoring ingredients until well incorporated. The process is the same for all flavor variations.
  3. Add the cream into the condensed milk and fold the mixture until no streaks remain.
  4. Using a funnel, pour the ice cream into ice candy bags. Tie a knot and freeze overnight, or until it is completely set.
Miguel Ortega SEE AUTHOR Miguel Ortega

Miguel once worked for a bank before realizing words did so much more for him than numbers ever could (because if you can't dazzle with brilliance, you sure can baffle with bullshit). He has since gone on to write regular articles for Rogue magazine and video scripts for large-scale corporations, on top of working as a communications associate.

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