Recipes

The Pepper Guide to Simbang Gabi Breakfast #2: Quickmelt Coddled Eggs and Bacon

December 17, 2015

Quickmelt is, as millenials call it, my jam. It is my secret shame, the guiltiest pleasure that will kill my reputation as a writer with any semblance of a refined palate. I eat it in chunks, shave it over luxurious silky pasta that deserves pecorino Romano or Parmeggiano Reggiano, and bake it on seafood, which is a culinary cardinal sin.

Bacon

My favorite use of it comes in a semi-disgusting breakfast plate—basically bacsilog, with thick slices of quickmelt and spicy suka. A perfect bite ratio would mean first dunking bacon and a chunk of quickmelt in a bath of vinegar, then shoving it onto a very large spoon that has chilli garlic, a bit of egg, and a copious amount of garlic rice. When I lived abroad for a time, I craved it more than I did sinigang or adobo, which says a lot about who I am as a person (and what my blood and fat is now most likely composed of), and at least twice a week, I would cook this monster up as my morning meal, terrifying ordinary, cereal-and-oatmeal people around me.

Quickmelt Coddled Eggs with Bacon and Soldiers

Quickmelt turns into a cheesy, salty topping for slowly coddled eggs, with both crispy shards of bacon and toasted bread as edible receptacles for golden, molten yolks.

Yield: 1 serving
Total Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 2 tbsps Quickmelt, grated
  • 4 strips bacon
  • 1 slice of whole-wheat toast
  • salt and pepper, to taste

Procedure

  1. Crack two eggs into a ramekin or heatproof jar. Assemble a bain-marie in a pan with water that comes 3/4 up the side of the jar.
  2. Cover the jar with aluminum foil and simmer for 8-10 minutes, or until the egg is just set but still runny. Season with salt and pepper and add the cheese. Torch or put under the broiler to brown.
  3. While the eggs are cooking, render the bacon until completely crisp.
  4. Toast the bread and slice into four lengthwise pieces.
  5. Dip the bacon and toast into the eggs.
Pamela Cortez Pamela Cortez Pamela Cortez writes about food full-time, and has honed her craft while writing for publications such as Rogue, Town and Country, and The Philippine Star. She once rode on a mule for a mile just to eat mint tea and lamb in Morocco, and has eaten a block of Quickmelt in one sitting. Her attempt at food photography can be viewed online @meyarrr. FOLLOW
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