Restaurants / Bars

Making Bread with Panaderya Toyo’s Richie Manapat

September 30, 2018

For all of its love for rice and noodles, the Philippines has a curious relationship with bread. True enough, the panaderya—a small neighborhood bakery with a notable variety of yeasted baked goods distinct to the Philippines—exists. But bread is often underrated, seen as mere meryenda rather than the versatile carbohydrates they can be, and are often packed with additives that keep costs low but health stakes high. Panaderya Toyo sought to change that with their great variety of breads, many patterned after traditional panaderya fare but seen in an artisanal light. Honoring tradition, their breads are leavened through the natural process of fermentation (in the form of a sourdough starter, not commercial yeast), relying on quality ingredients and proper technique (not preservatives) to get excellent results.

Demonstrating not only skill, but also love and passion for the craft, head baker Richie Manapat walks us through the ways of making three of Panaderya Toyo’s signatures. For their Black Rice Sourdough, Manapat turns the sourdough tradition on its head with local black rice in the dough’s sourdough starter. Meanwhile, the deceptively plain-looking Buttermilk Loaf also relies on sourdough action for its leavening, but boasts a brioche-like richness and sunny tang thanks to butter and buttermilk. Last up is the bakery’s eponymous ode to the local street-peddled doughnuts known as Bicho-Bicho, which Manapat gives a surprising—yet welcome—savory twist with the use of pork jus in both the dough and in its sticky, sweet glaze.


PANADERYA TOYO

A daytime bakery and café serving bromate-free, yeast-free, sourdough-based bread.

ADDRESS: The Alley at Karrivin, 2316 Pasong Tamo Extension, Makati City
VISIT: 11AM-6PM Tuesdays to Saturdays
CONTACT: 0917-720-8630 / may@toyoeatery.com
SPEND: PHP 85-750
FOLLOW: Instagram

Pamela Cortez Pamela Cortez

Pamela Cortez writes about food full-time, and has honed her craft while writing for publications such as Rogue, Town and Country, and The Philippine Star. She once rode on a mule for a mile just to eat mint tea and lamb in Morocco, and has eaten a block of Quickmelt in one sitting. Her attempt at food photography can be viewed online @meyarrr.

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