15-Minute Hummus Dip with Cucumber Sticks: Simply the Easiest Dip Ever

By Stephanie Ong/August 22, 2013

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Hummus is a common item found in Middle Eastern restaurant menus. It’s usually made from a combination of mashed chickpeas blended with tahini (a sesame paste), lemon, olive oil, garlic, and a dash of salt.

Easy Hummus1

A lot of people describe Hummus to be a historical and ancient food, given the basic ingredients of this tasty mush. But this recipe does not require the ancient method (which sometimes involves the tableflip-inducing task of skinning chickpeas). Instead, we took the short cut and used canned garbanzos and tossed them in a food processor, which resulted to a silky-smooth dip that went perfectly with some refreshing cucumber sticks.

Easy Hummus2

The only area where a bit of effort is needed is in the preparation of the Tahini. Sometimes, people tend to use store bought tahini—or even skip adding it altogether (but why, people?!?)—but we found that the freshly-toasted sesame flavor brings a lot of heck yes to the table.

Easy Hummus3

This is a very simple, no-frills hummus recipe. If you have a food processor you can make this any time.

Easy Hummus Dip

Total Time: 15 minutes / Yield: 15 ounces

Ingredients for the Tahini

  • 100 grams of sesame seeds
  • Extra virgin olive oil

Ingredients for the Hummus

  • ½ a lemon
  • 1 clove of garlic, minced
  • 1 450-gram can of garbanzos
  • Paprika
  • Salt
  • Pepper

Other Ingredients

  • Crudités
  • Pita chips
  • Cucumber Sticks

Procedure

  1. You can do your tahini like this: 1) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Put a baking sheet over a pan and pour your sesame seeds out evenly into it. Stick the pan in for a good ten minutes. You can move them around to make sure they aren’t getting burnt OR 2) Heat up a little pan with olive oil. Cook your sesame seeds in it till they turn golden brown. It should start to smell like tahini already!
  2. After the seeds have cooled a bit, use your food processor (or blender) to create a creamy paste. Add olive oil as you go to ensure it gets to the texture you like. When you’re happy with your tahini’s creaminess, set it aside.
  3. Open the can of garbanzos, drain most of the juice but keep a little extra for blending. Stick the garbanzos in your blender and blend away.
  4. Add olive oil, garlic, garbanzo juice, and lemon.
  5. Add the tahini. Blend, blend, blend. Add your salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Once you’ve reached the perfect texture, pour your hummus out into a bowl to serve. Top it off with a little bit of the olive oil and a sprinkling of paprika.
  7. Best served with cucumber sticks, crudités, or pita chips.

Stephanie Ong

Mad Scientist

Stephanie Ong is a freelance writer/bibliophile. In her spare time, she likes to hang out with the Sherlock to her Watson, Lucas. Previously considered a stage four disaster in the kitchen, she now attempts to cook without much fuss – although she still chops at the speed of a turtle stuck in peanut butter. Her favorite things include horror movies, the blues, date night with her man, and breakfast for dinner. See More.

  • Clare Lorenzo

    comfort food! <3 I shall make this soooon! <3

  • Ana Zandueta

    FYI, for one to produce smooth paste for tahini, it should be hulled sesame seed, not just any other sesame seed-it will be gritty if you use the ones with the hull.And, by the way, using fresh dried garbanzos are MUCH better than canned ones.I did make this mistake before and I made it from fresh ones-the canned version easily disintegrates to a mush (depends on your taste for texture but I didn’t like it).Your recipe is missing one thing-GARLIC.At least a clove or 2.

    • Stephanie

      You are absolutely right about the garlic, Ana – thank you for mentioning this! As you can see it is now mentioned above :) We do use the canned garbanzos though, as this is the “easy” version. And for the sesame seeds, we will try the hulled kind sometime! Thanks!

  • Dette

    Thank you for this recipe! I made this today and it was so good! I used canned garbanzo beans and regular sesame seeds and it was delicious. I left out the garlic because I’m not a fan of raw garlic breath, but I’m sure it would taste good too if it had a bit. I’ll experiment next time. Now I don’t have to buy hummus from the synagog or buy that expensive tahini from Santi’s!

  • Karl Sampang

    hey uh how long will this tahini keep?

    • Stephanie

      I’ve read that tahini can be stored for quite awhile, but the oil may separate. People say that you can keep it in a cool, dry place instead of refrigerating it. I haven’t stored any myself, but I hope this helps.