Ingredients

5 Disgusting Local Bugs that Can Actually Satisfy Your Hunger

November 17, 2014

Bug-eating sounds like the stuff of castaways, but the practice is very much alive and well in the Philippines. If you’re bored of the usual fare and are looking for a gastronomic adventure, you won’t have to go too far. Some of these bugs may even make a special guest appearance at a local city restaurant or two, such as Cabalen. They’re not there for shock effect; they are, according to locals, quite delicious depending on how they’re prepared and chock full of proteins and vitamins. Would you dare to try these bugs?

1. Kamaro – Mole Crickets

Edible Bugs1

They are the most common insects served at restaurants. Cabalen in particular serves them adobo-style. Other variations include frying them straight up, or serving them in gata or coconut milk. Texture has been described to be crisp on the outside, but moist on the inside.

2. Bee Larvae

Edible Bugs2

Bee Larvae is popularly snacked on in China and Japan, but it also has a following here as pulutan. Bees are fried and baked, and some larvae with residue honey has been found to have a nutty flavor.

3. Salagubang (June bug)

Edible Bugs3

These bugs are grilled over charcoal, or cooked with vegetables. The flesh is said to taste similar to chicken meat, and it fetches a hefty price in the market due to its seasonal nature.

4. Karakara (Carpenter Ant)

Edible Bugs4

A rare delicacy from the Ilocos Region, eating the karakara is an exercise in eating dangerously.Their eggs are sought after for the dish, not an easy feat as the adult ant is known for having a deadly bite.

5. Anay (termite)

EdibleBugs5

While not as commonly eaten, a number have expressed an appreciation for the protein-rich termite. The more eggs in a termite, the juicier, the better, so I’ve been told. If you can’t stomach the idea of having it as is, termites have also been incorporated as adobo and sinigang.

Have you tried eating bugs? What was it like? Leave a comment below.

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Mia Marci Mia Marci Mia Marci likes sampling street food, even if she doesn't know what's in it. She's gotten sick to her stomach on occasion because of this hazardous curiosity, but even the strictest of doctors couldn't stop her. Mia also writes about video games, travel, and girly issues for other publications. She also teaches English and Creative Writing. In the little spare time she has left, she catches up on film and TV shows, while cuddling up to her dog and cat. FOLLOW FOLLOW
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Nico Goco

We get to eat Salagubang over at Nueva Ecija just before the rains start in May. Usually it’s cooked as adobo or sinampalukan. I’d say the taste is closer to bihod or fish roe. 🙂

Volts Sanchez
Volts Sanchez

I’ve only had kamaro (camaru?) in Arayat. Adobo, strong-tasting and delicious. I’m game for the rest, but only if they were easy to find.

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